The sound of spoken words: Haiku and Momoko

It was a day of Haiku and poetry in the gallery yesterday, with a fascinating and enjoyable Haiku taster workshop by Alan Summers and Karen Hoy, in which participants penned their Haiku from found words or experiences of the art work in the gallery.

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This was followed in the afternoon by an illuminating poetry reading by Lizzie Latham that included the premiere recital of the first chapter of her new poem ‘Momoko’.

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The gallery was resonant with the performative sound of spoken words.

http://www.withwords.org.uk
http://llatham.blogspot.co.uk/

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One response to “The sound of spoken words: Haiku and Momoko

  1. Karen and myself had a wonderful time doing the haiku taster session, with great participants!

    The gallery is incredibly beautiful and even more impressive than the photographs suggest. I was doubly in awe as to how much extra work needed to be done removing rubble etc… before the art gallery could even start to be curated. 2am finishes in order to get this beautiful exhibition up and running and curated is inspiring, and created a beautiful space for a haiku workshop.

    Writing haiku that do not directly bear on the inspirational and deeply moving art, was not impossible, as if the exhibition supported us in attempting haiku.

    I was able to create lateral narratives, as were the participants, and from just one of the wonderful artworks you can see in the picture above:

    an intended tear?
    you left me hanging
    in my own gallery

    Alan Summers

    weblink: https://stillpointsmovingworld.wordpress.com/artist-camilla-nelson/

    I hope to see participant’s haiku up here too, but in the meantime…

    … from the subverted photograph source code of another exhibit:

    wild fields
    mother, I cropped
    your jpeg

    Alan Summers

    Summer kigo (seasonal reference)

    no, nohara 野原 refers to wild fields or moors.
    のはら nohara = wild field

    More about kigo (and kire):

    More than one fold in the paper: Kire, kigo, and the vertical axis of meaning in haiku by Alan Summers: http://area17.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/more-than-one-fold-in-paper-kire-kigo.html

    And a fun verse, not haiku or senryu, just short verse:

    haiku students
    the many ways to sit
    on industrial carpet

    Alan Summers

    warm regards,
    Alan
    http://area17.blogspot.com
    http://www.withwords.org.uk

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